Good news : please Help map 1 .. 1.1...2. 2.1. 3.. 4 .. 5 ...6 what 30000 people zoom-celebrated HK startups July 2020future 8 billion peoples want to value2020 top alumni group Fazle Abed- search your top WRJ if not found rsvp chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk who are top job creating economists by practice - health -refugee sports green hong kong..where are top tour guides around billionaire 1 2 around poverty,,, we the peoples ...
2020 Entrepreneurial Revolutions top 10
1abc hong kong fintech
2abc seoul
3abc Vienna & Hague
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5abc nordica
6abc haidian-beijing youth
7abc barcelona
8abc uae
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ER begun 1976 The Economist 1 2
OUTOFBELTWAY.COM lives matter-can human-tech leap over value chains of shelf -safety*health*education*loveq*finance
latest heroic city medellin .what happened to humans in last 75 years
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Questions about 45th annually top 10 entrepreneurial revolution spaces-Why is hong kong top? First the virus has caused a general post- places where people havent em;powered schools to practice humanity online are finding out how dismally unsustainable drowning in fake media can be- why has dhaka fallen out? how did new york state (outofwallstreet) make a comeback after 12 subprimed years? how did vienna leap ahead of geneva?...why do we still value uae-jordan? will adam smith's LOG make a comeback in time for the sustainability generation to be reality? how did new zealand make a comeback for first time in 15 years? why no west coast entries? why no african entry : it breaks our heart that kenya fell out and the good news is there are small countries now leaping ahead but it doesnt do them any favor to headline them until africa more coopreread the economist 1976 survey on entrepreneurial revolution- searching for an alternative to west's big 3 of corop-gov-foundation so that small start up leapfroging could match reality that 90% of innovations improving human lot were incubated msall and relemteslly over time not by 90 day profit takers-valuetrue.com if you cant exponentially see that a business model devoid of goodwill multiplying stakeholder energies is the least sustainable org design in the world then quite frankly you should not be let near big data on any of the tech that according to moore's law singularity now offer trillion times more analytic capability than available to the female team at mit that coded moon landing
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ideologies that seem to confine 1.5 billion people to be more than 3 times poorer than americans make no sense -why not celebrate every way chinese - diaspora as well as mainlanders- unites sdg- generations goals- china number 1 country to help small enterprise Soc5 and IR4 with - see why at valuetrue.com; america always be 21st C friend- how else can we celebrate the best of english and coding languages with youth www unacknowledgedgiant.com or text washington dc (+1) 240 316 8157
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Wednesday, April 29, 2020

thanks to tghe frenmch cultural mkission to new york (particularly frank jaumont) and un , ny has work,ing eamples of dual langiage schools- these require the commun ipty to spemd a lot of time comiting to m.aking them work

one of the reasons why the whole of gthe jusa should be cponcerend about kits langiage deficit is discussed in tghis tedx by jaumost co=-auhtor of the gift of languages in this tedx -

Kathleen Stein-Smith at TEDxFairleighDickinsonUniversity

00:00
Translator: Nadia Gabriel Reviewer: Ellen Maloney
00:04
I'd like to talk to you today about the US foreign language deficit,
00:09
and how it impacts our economic and national security.
00:14
The first question that a lot of people are going to say
00:18
when introduced to a new concept is: "What is it?"
00:22
They might then say,
00:24
"Why should I care? What does it matter?"
00:28
And then, if you do get engaged,
00:31
you're going to conclude by saying, "What can I do? How can I help?"
00:37
I'd like to lead off with, again, a reference to Edward Snowden.
00:44
Recently, in August of 2013,
00:46
among the information that he did release,
00:49
was also information about the black budgets
00:53
of the United States government.
00:55
And of course, looking at the foreign language numbers,
00:59
I was amazed to read that
01:02
in all our federal intelligence services in the United States -
01:07
and that's about one million people -
01:09
we have about 900 people who are fluent in Chinese.
01:13
And about 1,900 who are fluent in all of the Middle-Eastern languages combined.
01:20
That's amazing, taking into consideration
01:22
the geopolitical importance of those regions.
01:28
Okay, now here's an old joke:
01:31
A person who speaks two languages is bilingual.
01:35
A person who speaks three languages is trilingual.
01:39
A person who speaks four or more languages is multilingual.
01:43
A person who speaks one language is an American.
01:48
An old joke, but still very very true.
01:51
Okay, what is this language deficit?
01:55
According to a Gallup poll, only 20 to 25 per cent of Americans
01:59
feel comfortable having a conversation, engaging in conversation,
02:04
in a language other than English.
02:09
According to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages,
02:13
only 18.5 per cent of K-12 students in the United States
02:18
are enrolled in a foreign language course.
02:23
At the post-secondary level, college and university level,
02:28
a mere eight per cent of college and university students
02:32
in the United States are currently enrolled
02:34
in a foreign language course.
02:40
On the other hand, 56 per cent of Europeans
02:45
feel comfortable holding a conversation in their own language, plus one.
02:53
And 28 per cent of Europeans feel comfortable
02:57
engaging in conversation in at least two languages other than their own.
03:06
How long has the foreign language deficit been around?
03:09
Is it new? Not really.
03:13
You can find discussion of it back to the 1940s.
03:17
But in the contemporary era, the contemporary conversation,
03:21
we can place the beginning in 1979.
03:25
The report "Strength Through Wisdom,"
03:28
a report from a presidential commission.
03:31
That started the conversation.
03:33
And what really increased the momentum,
03:36
was the book published in 1980, the following year,
03:41
by Senator Paul Simon,
03:42
"The Tongue-Tied American: Confronting the Foreign Language Crisis."
03:47
That was published in 1980.
03:50
Alright, we know what it is, you've seen the numbers.
03:55
You've seen the beginning of it,
03:57
the origins of the foreign language deficit.
04:00
But why does it really matter?
04:02
Well, it really does matter
04:04
because 75 per cent of the world's population
04:07
does not speak English.
04:11
Also, our relative lack of communication affects business, government,
04:18
all over the world.
04:20
It also affects us personally,
04:23
limiting our personal, professional, and career options.
04:29
There has been so much written on the US foreign language deficit,
04:34
over so many years,
04:36
by educators, by government, by industry leaders,
04:41
by business education leaders.
04:43
And I just want to point out a few of, I think, the most relevant, documents.
04:50
[Why Does It Matter? From Forbes]
04:52
Forbes, in 2012, a blog post,
04:56
America's foreign language deficit, written by the president of Cornell,
05:01
and one of the officers of Cornell University.
05:08
A little bit earlier in 2012, in June,
05:12
the Council on Foreign Relations.
05:14
Another blog post, "Foreign languages and US economic competitiveness."
05:19
How important is that?
05:23
At about the same time, the Council on Foreign Relations
05:26
published a piece written by the president of the Council,
05:31
the Council for Applied Linguistics,
05:34
"Languages for Jobs Initiative."
05:37
How clear is the connection?
05:40
Still, why does it matter?
05:42
What about Senate hearings?
05:45
There are numerous Government Accountability Office reports,
05:49
and also Senate hearings.
05:51
Two of the most recent took place in 2010 and 2012.
05:56
"Closing the Language Gap:
05:58
Improving the Federal Government Foreign Language Capabilities," in 2010.
06:03
And then even more alarmingly, "A National Security Crisis:
06:07
Foreign Language Capabilities in the Federal Government."
06:11
Across governmental agencies,
06:13
from law enforcement, to technology, to intelligence gathering.
06:19
But still, why does it really matter?
06:22
University of Phoenix, alright, their research institute,
06:26
now known as the Apollo Research Institute,
06:29
has published two major reports on foreign languages and the work place.
06:35
The first one, "The Great Divide: Worker and Employer Perspectives,"
06:41
on skills, what skills are going be demanded.
06:44
And then the second report,
06:46
"Current and Future Foreign Language Demands in the Workplace."
06:50
Both in 2011.
06:52
Still, why does it matter if we still need to be convinced?
06:56
"The Language Flagship," released in 2009,
06:59
a report "What Business Wants: Language Needs in the 21st Century."
07:05
It's what business wants.
07:07
From the National Research Council in 2007,
07:11
"International Education and Foreign Language Education:
07:16
Keys to Securing America's Future."
07:23
In 2006, we had the "National Security Language Initiative,"
07:28
known for promoting the concept of critical languages.
07:32
From the Committee for Economic Development, the report,
07:36
"Education for Global Leadership: The Importance of International Studies
07:41
and Foreign Language Education for US Economic and National Security."
07:48
From the Department of Defense, "Defense Language Transformation Roadmap,"
07:53
first promulgated in 2005.
08:00
Now we know what it is, and we know how much it matters,
08:04
to us as a nation, to us individually.
08:10
What can we do?
08:11
We can act as individuals.
08:14
We can act as members of educational institutions.
08:19
We can act as businesses, business owners, business leaders, and business educators.
08:25
We can act as government, government agencies,
08:29
local government, state government, national government.
08:34
As individuals, this is self-evident,
08:38
we can learn another language.
08:41
Anyone at any age can learn a language.
08:45
Motivation is the best predictor of success.
08:49
Budget matters far less.
08:52
Motivation is key.
08:55
We can encourage our family and friends to learn another language.
08:59
Talk to your children, your parents, your cousins, your next-door neighbor.
09:04
We can advocate for foreign language education,
09:08
in our towns, in our school districts, at the state level,
09:13
and also at the national level.
09:16
If advocacy is not enough, we can become a change agent.
09:21
We can certainly vote for candidates who favor foreign language education,
09:25
we can become candidates for public office ourselves.
09:30
What can educational institutions do?
09:33
Well we're sitting here in a university library.
09:36
Educational institutions can adopt foreign language requirements,
09:42
and enforce existing ones.
09:46
However, I think possibly more interestingly,
09:49
and more importantly, in this age
09:52
where foreign language has, if not disappeared from classrooms,
09:57
has receded from university classroom.
10:01
You saw that figure of eight per cent of students
10:05
that we spoke about a couple of minutes ago.
10:07
What we also can do, as universities,
10:11
we can offer informal co-curricular
10:15
and experiential language learning experiences and opportunities.
10:20
Think of the possibilities on a campus like this.
10:24
We have students from all over the world, speaking many many different languages.
10:29
We're located in Bergen County, NJ,
10:32
surrounded, once again, by many many languages.
10:35
The possibilities here are truly endless.
10:39
What can we do about it?
10:41
Companies, large and small, can compensate, can offer
10:48
they can compensate for,
10:50
or even offer opportunities for foreign language instruction.
10:54
Onsite, or fund study that's offsite, off the company campus.
11:01
What can government do?
11:04
Government can and does do a great deal.
11:07
Government certainly can offer compensation, advancement, training
11:12
to government employees across all of the agencies
11:16
who possess or who are in the process of learning
11:20
needed foreign language skills.
11:23
We do see this across the federal government.
11:26
Government can increase tax and other advantages
11:29
for people studying foreign languages for workplace needs.
11:35
Government can also increase, actually maintain and even increase,
11:41
funding for foreign language initiatives.
11:46
As you all know, in 2008,
11:48
it's some of the foreign language programs that have been put forward, post 9/11,
11:54
they were subject to the same budget restrictions as many many other programs.
12:00
We can look to the literature.
12:02
We have a great report from the Center for Applied Linguistics,
12:06
"Building the Foreign Language Capacity We Need:
12:10
Toward a Comprehensive Strategy for a Foreign Language Framework."
12:15
Notice the use of the term "framework,"
12:18
very much inspired by language practice and language policy in the European Union.
12:26
What can we do?
12:28
The MLA, Modern Language Association, has come out with a report:
12:32
"Foreign Languages and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changed World."
12:38
Notice they don't say, "Changing world."
12:40
The world has already changed.
12:44
What can we do about it?
12:46
We can learn from others.
12:47
"What We Can Learn From Foreign Language Teaching in Other Countries."
12:52
Their successes, their challenges.
12:55
"Promoting a Language Proficient Society: What You Can Do."
13:00
We have from the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages,
13:03
"Realizing Our Vision of Languages for All."
13:06
That was the theme of their 2005 language year.
13:09
And "Standards for Foreign Language Education," since 1996.
13:14
We have Mary Louise Pratt's piece from Silver Dialogues at NYU,
13:19
"Building a New Public Idea About Language."
13:22
There's a lot we can do.
13:25
Concluding thoughts: will we be tongue-tied or fluent?
13:29
There are encouraging signs.
13:31
Secretary of Education Duncan, then CIA director Panetta,
13:36
spoke at the national Foreign Language Summit in 2010.
13:41
In April 2013, Deputy Assistant Secretary
13:45
for International and Foreign Language Education, Clay Pell was appointed.
13:51
May 2013, the late Senator Frank Lautenberg
13:54
and Representative Rush Holt from New Jersey
13:57
introduced legislation in the House and the Senate
14:00
on foreign language education.
14:03
The next steps: Learn from the research,
14:06
learn from best practice from around the world.
14:11
The very last step:
14:13
develop a strategic social marketing plan involving all constituencies,
14:18
government, business, education.
14:21
Involve celebrities;
14:22
bilingual role models like Johnny Depp, Sandra Bullock, Alex Rodriguez,
14:28
the list is long.
14:30
And final question: Many countries have language policies,
14:35
the United States does not.
14:38
Should the United States have a foreign language policy,
14:42

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